Ayrshire woman fined for failing to seek veterinary treatment for ailing pony and donkey

0

An Ayrshire woman has been fined £500 for failing to provide necessary veterinary care to her pony and donkey.

A black Shetland pony and a gray miniature donkey owned by Anne McCrae Dick, of Tarbolton, were found to have numerous health issues when Scottish SPCA officers carried out an investigation in October last year.

Both animals are believed to have been suffering from overgrown hooves for six to nine months, with the pony, named Ebony, having to be put to sleep to end his suffering.

A visit to Dick’s property reported that the donkey, named Annie, had overgrown feet and dental issues, while Ebony was hesitant to walk, uninterested in grazing and sweating, which is an indication of pain.

Officers made several attempts to contact Dick, 72, to let her know she needed to make an emergency appointment with a farrier.

And when they finally got through to her, Dick said she was on vacation and would make an appointment with a farrier when she got home.



Ebony had painful overgrown hooves that curled upwards

Scottish SPCA inspector Caitlin Rea said: ‘She refused to have her own vet present and was advised that we would be calling an independent vet to examine Ebony and Annie as treatment could not be delayed any longer.

“Both animals were found to be suffering from chronic laminitis, an extremely painful condition affecting the tissues connecting the hoof wall to the pedal bone in the hoof.

“Ebony’s heart and breathing rates were elevated. Further examination also revealed that Annie suffered from loose and decaying teeth as well as ulcerated gums caused by severe dental proliferation.



Annie the donkey also suffered from loose and decaying teeth, and ulcerated gums caused by severe dental proliferation.
Annie the donkey also suffered from loose and decaying teeth, and ulcerated gums caused by severe dental proliferation.

“Judging by the growth of their hooves, it was estimated that Ebony and Annie had been in pain for six to nine months. These equines needed urgent treatment for their feet and teeth.”

Ebony unfortunately had to be put to sleep, while Annie, now renamed Diamond, is currently in the care of one of the charity’s animal rescue and repatriation centers and is now ready to find her forever home. she.



A poor pony belonging to Anne McCrae Dick, of Tarbolton, had to be put to sleep due to her health problems which Dick did not resolve.
A poor pony belonging to Anne McCrae Dick, of Tarbolton, had to be put to sleep due to her health problems which Dick did not resolve.

Dick, who pleaded guilty in Ayr Sheriff’s Court to failing to provide proper farriery and veterinary care to his pony and donkey, was fined £500 with a victim surcharge of £20.

Ms Rea has now denounced the sentence as “very disappointing”, given the seriousness of the neglect.

She added: “Knowing that there is nothing to prevent the defendant from owning or caring for equines in the future is equally concerning and frustrating.

“Ebony and Annie should not have suffered if their owner had acted responsibly and sought the necessary farriery and veterinary care.”

• If anyone is worried about an animal, they can contact the confidential animal helpline on 03000 999 999.

Don’t miss the latest Ayrshire titles –sign up for our free daily newsletter here

Share.

Comments are closed.