Get vaccinated, get tested and seek treatment early, says chief medical officer

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Get vaccinated, get tested, and seek treatment early if you test positive for COVID-19 and feel unwell or at high risk. It’s the prescription of Nebraska’s chief medical officer, Dr. Gary Anthone, as the spread of the omicron variant looms during the holiday season. “The # 1 mechanism to fight COVID is to get vaccinated,” Anthone said. A call from a family in central Nebraska helped convey this point during Gov. Pete Ricketts’ press conference on Monday. Natalie Trace’s husband was not vaccinated. He spent almost a month on a ventilator and almost died. He is now at home but still struggling. “It’s no joke. It’s real. And it’s deadly,” Trace said. She said she would not wish the virus on her worst enemy. effects after COVID, we would have taken better precautions, ”Trace said. Ricketts said on Monday there were 523 hospital patients with COVID-19. That’s a slight drop from the 584 patients on Friday. “Nine out of 10 people in hospitals today are unvaccinated,” Ricketts said. Anthone said doctors now have other tools to keep you from going to the emergency room. physicians, please consider giving your patients monoclonal antibodies, ”said Anthone. prevent hospitalization and death by 76%. “So it’s a huge advantage to keep you out of the hospital,” Anthone said. Ricketts expressed frustration because he heard that some doctors would not prescribe the treatment. “If your doctor doesn’t give you that prescription and for no good reason, a lot of people have told me their doctors just don’t want to. Get a new doctor,” Ricketts said. Anthone said there is 86 infusion sites across the state. You can call the COVID-19 hotline at 531-2 49-1873 or visit covid.infusioncenter.org to make an appointment. “Almost all hospital systems and even small rural hospitals now have infusion sites for these monoclonal antibodies, “Anthone said. He said antivirals such as Remdesivir are also an effective treatment. Anthone said the federal government may approve two new ones, Merck’s Molnupiravir and Pfizer’s Paxlovid, for emergency use by the end of the month. ”These are all drugs that you can get a prescription for. Go to a pharmacy to get it and take it while you’re at home, “Anthone said. Testing is important. Monoclonal and antiviral treatments need to be taken with days of infection.” You need to get treatment early. . Ricketts said. He suggested getting tested before vacation reunions. “It’s another way to control the spread of the virus,” Ricketts said. Anthone reminds people to stay healthy and to add more zinc and vitamin D to your diet. ”Exercise to get outside when you can to eat the right kinds of foods. Fruits and vegetables, ”Anthone said.

Get vaccinated, get tested, and seek treatment early if you test positive for COVID-19 and feel unwell or at high risk.

It’s the prescription from Nebraska Chief Medical Officer Dr. Gary Anthone as the spread of the omicron variant looms over the holiday season.

“The # 1 mechanism to fight COVID is to get vaccinated,” Anthone said.

A plea from a central Nebraska family helped convey this point during Gov. Pete Ricketts’ press conference on Monday.

Natalie Trace’s husband was not vaccinated.

He spent almost a month on a ventilator and almost died.

He’s home now but still struggling.

“It’s no joke. It’s real. And it’s deadly,” Trace said.

She said she would not wish the virus on her worst enemy.

“If we had known by now how serious COVID can do, not only during COVID but the long-term effects after COVID, we would have taken better precautions,” Trace said.

Ricketts said on Monday there were 523 hospital patients with COVID-19.

This is a slight drop from the 584 patients on Friday.

“Today, nine out of ten people in hospitals are unvaccinated,” Ricketts said.

Anthone said doctors now have other tools to keep you from going to the emergency room.

“Please talk to your doctor (s), consider giving your patients monoclonal antibodies,” Anthone said.

He said the antibodies are recommended for people 12 years of age or older, at high risk, within 10 days of illness and not already hospitalized or requiring oxygen.

He said studies show they prevent hospitalization and death by 76%.

“So it’s a huge advantage to keep you out of the hospital,” Anthone said.

Ricketts expressed frustration because he heard that some doctors would not prescribe the treatment.

“If your doctor doesn’t give you that prescription and for no good reason, a lot of people have told me their doctors just don’t want to. Find a new doctor,” Ricketts said.

Anthone said there are 86 infusion sites across the state.

You can call the COVID-19 hotline at 531-249-1873 or visit covid.infusioncenter.org to make an appointment.

“Almost all hospital systems and even small rural hospitals now have infusion sites for these monoclonal antibodies,” Anthone said.

He said antivirals such as Remdesivir are also an effective treatment.

Anthone said the federal government could approve two new ones, Merck’s Molnupiravir and Pfizer’s Paxlovid, for emergency use by the end of the month.

“These are all drugs that you can get on a prescription. Go to a drugstore, pick them up and take them while you’re at home,” Anthone said.

Testing is important.

Monoclonal and antiviral treatments should be taken with days of infection.

“You have to get the treatment early,” Ricketts said.

He suggested getting tested before the holiday gatherings.

“It’s another way to help control the spread of the virus,” Ricketts said.

Anthone reminds people to stay healthy and add more zinc and vitamin D to their diet.

“To exercise to get outside when you can to eat the right kinds of foods. Fruits and vegetables,” Anthone said.

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